Triac's

This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Brandi Stidham 7 months ago.

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  • #9619

    Brandi Stidham
    Participant

    It lists Triac’s on your discription but didn’t see any posts in here so thought I would ask, what is a triac?


  • #9620
    John C
    John C
    Galco Representative

    Hello Brandi,
    TRIAC, from triode for alternating current, is a generic trademark for a three terminal electronic component that conducts current in either direction when triggered. Its formal name is bidirectional triode thyristor or bilateral triode thyristor. A thyristor is analogous to a relay in that a small voltage and current can control a much larger voltage and current. The illustration on the right shows the circuit symbol for a TRIAC where A1 is Anode 1, A2 is Anode 2, and G is Gate. Anode 1 and Anode 2 are normally termed Main Terminal 1 (MT1) and Main Terminal 2 (MT2) respectively. RIACs are a subset of thyristors and are related to silicon controlled rectifiers (SCRs). TRIACs differ from SCRs in that they allow current flow in both directions, whereas an SCR can only conduct current in a single direction. Most TRIACs can be triggered by applying either a positive or negative voltage to the gate (an SCR requires a positive voltage). Once triggered, SCRs and TRIACs continue to conduct, even if the gate current ceases, until the main current drops below a certain level called the holding current.


  • #9621

    Brandi Stidham
    Participant

    Perfect thank you John


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