MOV's

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Emmitt Mullins 8 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #9039

    Emmitt Mullins
    Participant

    The MOV what is it and how does it work?


  • #9040
    John C
    John C
    Galco Representative

    Hello Emmitt

    The MOV is a “Metal Oxide Varistor” and acts like 2 back to back high voltage Zener diodes. Also known as a voltage-dependent resistor (VDR), it has a nonlinear, non-ohmic current–voltage characteristic that is similar to that of a diode. Usually used for spike suppression on power lines feeding into most Industrial controllers.


  • #9041

    Emmitt Mullins
    Participant

    Ok but how does it do what it does?


  • #9042
    John C
    John C
    Galco Representative

    Ok Emmitt, this type contains a ceramic mass of zinc oxide grains, in a matrix of other metal oxides (such as small amounts of bismuth, cobalt, manganese) sandwiched between two metal plates (the electrodes). The boundary between each grain and its neighbour forms a diode junction, which allows current to flow in only one direction. The mass of randomly oriented grains is electrically equivalent to a network of back-to-back diode pairs, each pair in parallel with many other pairs. When a small or moderate voltage is applied across the electrodes, only a tiny current flows, caused by reverse leakage through the diode junctions. When a large voltage is applied, the diode junction breaks down due to a combination of thermionic emission and electron tunneling, and a large current flows. The result of this behaviour is a highly nonlinear current-voltage characteristic, in which the MOV has a high resistance at low voltages and a low resistance at high voltages.
    This better?


  • #9043

    Emmitt Mullins
    Participant

    Thank you John


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